Banned Books, Part Seven

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.

Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Part Six

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

While many people remember the movie before the book, this classic novel has been challenged and banned due to its depiction of slavery and use of racial slurs. There are also references to rape.

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

This book is one of the most challenged books in the United States. Challengers death being part of the plot inappropriate, and they also take offense to Paterson’s use of the word “lord” and other improper words. They also say that the book promotes occultism, New Age religion, and secular humanism.

Goosebumps by R.L. Stine

This series was challenged for reasons that are probably pretty obvious – parents and libraries believing the stories to be too scary, as well as occultism. I grew up on these books (along with Animorphs), and you better believe that if I ever have children, they’ll be reading these books too.

 

The twenty-one books I’ve shared are just the tiniest sliver of the full list. What are your favorite banned books that I didn’t include in this series? Leave your thoughts below!


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Banned Books, Part Six

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.

Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five

 

 

Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Bloom

When I was searching through lists of banned books, I was pretty shocked to see one by Judy Bloom. This middle-grade book was banned and challenged for its mentions of sex and menstruation, as well as for it’s perceived anti-Christianity.

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

If you’ve read this book, then it’s probably no surprise to you that it’s been banned in many schools and libraries. Excessive violence, sexual content, anarchy, drinking, etc.; this book has it all.

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki

This award-winning graphic novel has been censored due to some people feeling that the content is too adult for its intended audience. It follows the story of two girls who are coming of age and exploring their sexual interests. The story also includes drug use, LGBT themes, and profanity.

Have you read any of these books? What were your thoughts?

Read Part Seven


Penny is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Banned Books, Part Five

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.

Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four

 

 

The Witches by Roald Dahl

Beloved children’s authors are not exempt from having books banned. Some libraries considered the book misogynistic and sexist, feeling that it teaches boys to hate women.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

This classic novel was banned by schools and libraries for many reasons: promoting euthanasia, offensive language, racism, and being anti-business.

Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

I remember hearing about all the controversies surrounding the Harry Potter series when I was growing up and still reading the series. Some schools and parents challenged and banned the book due to witchcraft, being anti-family and, my favorite, “setting bad examples.”

Have you read any of these books? What were your thoughts on them?

Read part six of this series
Read Part Seven


Penny is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Banned Books, Part Four

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.

Part One
Part Two
Part Three

 

 

Carrie by Stephen King

Stephen King’s first published novel, Carrie was banned in some places due to people believing it to be anti-religious, as well as it’s violence and sexual content.

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

This incredible graphic novel received a great deal of praise when it was released, but it was also banned and challenged in places around the US, including Illinois, Oregon, and California. The schools and teachers who banned the book cited its graphic language, its depiction of violence, that it was inappropriate for the intended age group and scenes of torture.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Due to its Netflix adaptation, this book has been widely discussed lately. Some schools decided that since they weren’t sure of how students would be affected by its themes of bullying and suicide, that it should be banned or restricted in their libraries.

Have you read any of these books? What were your thoughts?

Read part five
Read part six
Read Part Seven

Banned Books: Part Three

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.

Part One
Part Two

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

This may be one of the most well-known banned books in America. It was banned in many schools for its language, specifically, use of the n-word, and it’s depiction of racism.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

I wasn’t aware this popular trilogy had ever been banned or challenged until I started doing research to prepare for this series. It was banned in some schools because teachers and parents thought it was inappropriate for the age group that it was marketed for.

Saga, Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

This currently-running comic book series was challenged because some people saw it as “anti-family.” Issue 12 in the series was temporarily restricted on Apple because one of the panels featured an image of two men engaging in oral sex, although after some outcry, it was made available again.

Have you read any of these books? What were your thoughts?

Read Part Four
Read Part Five
Read Part Six
Read Part Seven

Banned Books, Part One

September 23-29 is Banned Books Week, a week that promotes the freedom to read. Every day this week, I’ll be sharing three banned books that you should add to your TBR lists.
(Since I didn’t get a chance to post yesterday, parts one and two will be posted today.)

 

  1. A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    I wanted to start things off with one of my favorite childhood authors. I grew up with a bunch of Shel Silverstein’s books, and adore them to this day. An elementary school in Florida banned this book due to two of his poems, “How Not To Have to Dry the Dishes” and “Little Abigail and the Beautiful Pony.” The school thought that the first poem promoted disobedience and that the second was improper since it described Abigail dying after her parents refuse to buy her a pony.
  2. The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
    If you’ve already been reading this blog, you know that Salman Rushdie is one of my favorite authors. The Satanic Verses is one of his most well-known novels. Many Muslims found the book offensive for a number of reasons, from the naming of some of the characters (such as Mahmoud being derogatory) to the title itself being sacrilegious. The release of the novel prompted violence, with the FBI having to get involved in order to stop attacks on bookstores. The Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, even called for Rushdie’s death.
  3. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    Many people are assigned Harper Lee’s classic novel in school, but this book has been periodically removed from classrooms all over America. The book is usually challenged due to its depiction of rape, as well as racial slurs and profanity.

Have you read any of these books? What were your thoughts?

Read part two of this series

Read part three of this series

Read part four of this series

Read part five of this series

Read part six of this series

Read part seven of this series