Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of January 6, 2021

One of my favorite aspects of comic books is the art, especially the cover art. For important issues, there are often numerous variant covers where the publishers commission incredible artists.

Here are my favorite comic book covers this week. If you’d like to see a list of this week’s new releases, click here.


Eternals Vol 5 #1
Marvel Comics
Cover art by Joe Quesada


Future State: Wonder Woman #1
DC Comics
Cover art by Joelle Jones


Future State: Wonder Woman #1
DC Comics
Cover art by Adam Hughes


Eternals Vol 5 #1
Marvel Comics
Cover art by Rian Gonzales


Star Trek: Year Five #18
IDW Publishing
Cover art by JJ Lendl


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Variant Covers of the Week – August 12, 2020

One of my favorite parts of comic book collecting is seeking out the variant covers of my favorite issues. For those of you who are either not familiar with or new to the comic book world, variant covers are essentially special or limited edition covers.

Click here for the list of new releases.


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Excellence #9
Image
Cover art by Taurin Clarke


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Batman’s Grave #9
DC Comics
Cover art by Stephen Platt


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Justice League Odyssey #23
DC Comics
Cover art by Skan


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Green Lantern Vol 6 Season 2 #6
DC Comics
Cover art by Tony S Daniel


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Detective Comics Vol 2 #1025
DC Comics
Cover art by Lee Bermejo


Which one of these covers is your favorite?
Let me know in the comments!




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Variant Covers of the Week – July 29, 2020

One of my favorite parts of comic book collecting is seeking out the variant covers of my favorite issues. For those of you who are either not familiar with or new to the comic book world, variant covers are essentially special or limited edition covers.

Click here for the list of new releases.


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Empyre #3
Marvel
Cover art by Michael Cho


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Mercy #4
Image
Cover art by Giuseppe Camuncoli


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Cable Vol 4 #2
Marvel
Cover art by Ariel Olivetti


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Sleeping Beauties #2
IDW
Cover art by Jenn Woodall


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That Texas Blood #2
Image
Cover art by Duncan Fegredo


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Batman Superman Vol 2 #10
DC
Cover art by Riccardo Federici


Which one of these covers is your favorite?
Let me know in the comments!




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of March 18th, 2020

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.


The Low Low Woods Joe Hill 4

The Low Low Woods #4
DC/Black Label
Cover art by Jenny Frison


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Witchblade Vol 2 #18
Image/Top Cow
Cover art by Roberta Ingranata


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X-Ray Robot #1
Dark Horse
Cover art by Chris Samnee & Matthew Wilson


batman covre

Batman Vol 3 #91
DC
Cover art by Francesco Mattina


bitter root 7

Bitter Root #7
Image
Cover art by Eliza Ivanova




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Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther by Nnedi Okorafor – A Review

Shuri Vol 1 cover

Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther by Nnedi Okorafor
Illustrated by Leonardo Romero
Coloring by Jordie Bellaire
Comic Book | Science Fiction | Superheroes
Published by Marvel
Released May 7th, 2019
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_2_stars

I wanted to like this collection so badly, but it just… wasn’t good.

When I saw that Marvel’s Shuri series was going to be written by science-fiction writer Nnedi Okorafor, I added it to my TBR immediately. I’ve read Okorafor’s Binti, and although I didn’t love that novella, I was intrigued enough by her writing to want to give some of her other work a shot.

Nnedi Okorafor
Nnedi Okorafor

In the Marvel comics world, Shuri was never a prominent character until quite recently. While she at one point took over the role of Black Panther from her brother and played parts in several storylines, she wasn’t ever the center of the story.

With the success of Marvel’s Black Panther film, that’s changed. Which is great! I loved the Black Panther movie and Shuri’s character was delightful. I’m always going to root for a fun, brilliant, female scientist. I wasn’t surprised to see Marvel releasing a Shuri-centric comic book series in the film’s wake.

It didn’t take long into the story to start to realize that Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther wasn’t going to live up to my expectations.

The very first thing I noticed was the atrocious artwork, which you can see below. The art itself was done by Leonardo Romero with the coloring being done by Jordie Bellaire. I don’t know whether to fault the artist or the colorist for this or perhaps both of them:

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It’s just bad. There’s no shading or defining of the character’s faces. It’s blocky and made up mainly of primary colors. There’s no depth to it. The artwork turned me off of this collection before the story even started. Comic books are a medium that depends on the art just as much as the story, and I was surprised to see such a lack of quality in a comic book series that has the potential of attracting new fans.

As a quick side note, the covers for this series were done by a different (and better) artist named Sam Spratt. The covers of all of these issues are gorgeous.

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One of Sam Spratt’s covers

The story takes place after T’Challa, aka Black Panther, takes off into space for an unknown mission. He’s essentially disappeared, and no one is sure how to bring him back. In the meantime, Shuri is approached by her mother and by a secret organization of African leaders and is asked to take on the role of Black Panther until her brother returns.

That’s only one part of this story. The other part is Shuri and friends trying to defeat a giant space insect who eats music and excretes black holes.

The story did absolutely nothing for me. Like the artwork, it was simplistic and one-dimensional. It also required previous knowledge of the characters, especially since Shuri is followed around by multi-dimensional beings and/or ghosts called the ancestors that sprang from a previous series. As I mentioned before, the creation of this series, at least on Marvel’s end, had to have been to attract some movie fans into the comics world, and it can be intimidating to readers when there’s so much of the backstory not explained.

Another issue I had is that there was so much nonsense going on that Shuri’s personality faded into the background. She can be a more interesting character than this series presents her as.

I’m going to give Nnedi Okorafor’s writing one more chance, mainly because I own a copy of her novel Akata Witch. However, I’m starting to think her writing just doesn’t mesh with me. Aside from that, the art in this collection is just terrible. I can’t recommend this series, but I guess if you’re a huge Shuri fan you might still want to read it. I won’t be continuing with this series.


Have you read Shuri, Vol 1? What did you think? Let me know in the comments.


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Monstress by Marjorie M. Liu – A Review

Monstress Volume 1 Marjorie M. Liu

Monstress, Volumes 1-3 by Marjorie M. Liu
Art by Sana Takeda
Fantasy | Science Fiction | Comic Book
Published by Image Comics
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_3_and_a_half_stars

I have no idea where I first heard of Marjorie Liu’s Monstress series, but it’s one that I’ve had on my mind for a few years. While I usually stick to Marvel or Star Trek comics (big surprise, right?), occasionally something from Image (which is a publisher that has some truly stunning titles) will catch my eye.

I was in the mood to re-read volume one and catch up the rest, so I picked up volumes 1-3 from my local library. I ended up only reading the first two, and this review will be discussing both.

To start, let’s talk about the story. There’s no way I can put it better than the official synopses:

Set in an alternate matriarchal 1900’s Asia, in a richly imagined world of art deco-inflected steampunk, MONSTRESS tells the story of a teenage girl who is struggling to survive the trauma of war, and who shares a mysterious psychic link with a monster of tremendous power, a connection that will transform them both and make them the target of both human and otherworldly powers.

How perfect is that? This is exactly the kind of comic book series that I need in my life.

The art in the series, done by Sana Takeda, is gorgeous. I love the art deco vibes, and the dark color scheme fits it really well. The look and style of the characters, especially the arcanic characters, are stunning.

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Now, let’s talk about the story itself and the writing.

I read a lot of high fantasy and science fiction, most of which contain a lot of new world-building. In fact, great world-building is one of the things I look for in fiction. It’s why authors like Brandon Sanderson and Leigh Bardugo are some of my favorites. The world-building in Monstress, however, was jumbled and very often confusing. There are also places where there’s quite a bit of info-dumping, which I feel shouldn’t be necessary for a comic book series.

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Writing stories for comic books isn’t easy. The majority of issues are around 22-25 pages and mostly images, which means that the writer needs to be able to craft a compelling narrative that readers can grasp easily and quickly. This doesn’t mean that the story needs to be simple; in fact, many comic books today, even from established publishers like Marvel and DC Comics, are releasing stories that have a lot of depth to them. When I read Monstress, though, I found myself having to flip back and forth multiple times in order to figure out what was going on and to make sense of this new, very complicated world.

The story that Liu has created is absolutely entrancing, and I would love to read more of it. I just don’t feel that a comic book series was necessarily the right way to tell this story. There’s almost too much world-building and lore, especially for a medium where there’s not a lot of room to explore it.

Despite the stunning art, the story was too hard to follow and I found myself no longer enjoying it. I hate that I’m saying this because I really wanted to like this series. It should be one of my favorites, just based on the idea behind it. The execution, though, and the fact that it’s a comic book rather than a novel (which I think would have worked so much better for a story as complicated as this one) made me realize that it really isn’t the series for me.


Have you read any of the Monstress series? If so, what did you think? Let me know in the comments!


Looking for some other great fantasy comic books to read?

The Realm | Skyward | Black Bolt | Doctor Strange: The Oath




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of August 28, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Normally I only post the five best covers of the week, but there was absolutely no way I could narrow it down this time. Therefore, here are the ten best comic book covers of the week.


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #18
Art by Marcos Martin
Marvel


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Stranger Things Six #4
Art by Christian Ward
Dark Horse


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Marvel Comics #1000
Art by Jen Bartel
Marvel


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Tommy Gun Wizards #1
Art by Christian Ward
Dark Horse


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House of X #3
Art by Sara Pichelli
Marvel


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #18
Art by Alan Davis
Marvel


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Martian Manhunter Vol 5 #8
Art by Joshua Middleton
DC


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Black Panther Vol 7 #15
Art by Daniel Acuna
Marvel


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House of X #3
Art by Mahmud Asrar
Marvel


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Ascender #5
Art by Dustin Nguyen
Image




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of August 14th, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.


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Silver Surfer Black #3
Art by Tradd Moore


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Captain Marvel Vol 9 #9
Art by Mark Brooks


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #17
Art by Emanuela Lupacchino


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Wonder Woman Vol 5 #76
Art by Jenny Frison


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Powers of X #2
Art by Patrick Zircher




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of July 31, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.


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Powers of X #1
Marvel
Art by Mike Deodato Jr


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Powers of X #1
Marvel
Art by Joshua Cassara


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Beauty #28
Image
Art by Thomas Nachlik and Nick Filardi


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Captain America Vol 9 #12
Marvel
Art by Alex Ross


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Ice Cream Man #13
Image
Art by Wes Craig




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of July 24, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.



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Invisible Kingdom #5
Dark Horse Comics
Art by Christian Ward


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House of X #1
Marvel
Art by Joe Madureira


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Wicked + The Divine #44
Image
Art by Emma Rios & Miquel Muerto


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Valkyrie Jane Foster #1
Marvel
Art by Meghan Hetrick


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Star Trek Q Conflict #6
IDW
Art by George Caltsoudas




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Best Comic Book Covers of the Week

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.



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Little Bird #5
Art by Ian Bertram


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Pearl #11
Art by Taki Soma


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Domino Hotshots #5
Art by David Baldeon


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Cyberforce Vol 5 #11
Art by Raff Ienco


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Collapser #1
Art by Nick Derington




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Best Comic Book Covers of the Week

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.



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Wolverine vs Blade Special #1
Art by Dave Wilkens


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War of the Realms Omega #1
Art by Phil Noto


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Wonder Woman Vol 5 #74
Art by Jenny Frison


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Wolverine vs Blade Special #1
Art by Matteo Scalera


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Catwoman Vol 5 #13
Art by Joëlle Jones




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Best Comic Book Covers of the Week

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.



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Star Wars Vader Dark Visions #5
Art by Greg Smallwood


Venom Vol 4 #15

 

Art by Kyle Hotz


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Wonder Woman Vol 5 #72
Art by Jenny Frison


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Sonata #1
Art by Brian Haberlin & Geirrod Van Dyke


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Detective Comics Vol 2 #1005
Art by Stjepan Sejic




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Comic Book Covers of the Week

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.



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Black Cat #1
Art by Stanley Artgerm Lau


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Green Lantern Vol 6 #8
Toni Infante


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Witchblade Vol 2 #14
Art by Roberta Ingranata


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Man-Eaters #9
Art by Lia Miternique


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Thumbs #1
Art by Hayden Sherman




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Daredevil: Back in Black, Volume 8: The Death of Daredevil by Charles Soule – A Review

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Daredevil: Back in Black, Volume 8: The Death of Daredevil
Written by Charles Soule
Art by Phil Noto
Comic Book
Published by Marvel
Released February 5, 2019
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_3_stars

While Daredevil has never been one of my favorite Marvel characters, he is one that I’ve always wanted to know a little more about. My interest was piqued by the Daredevil Netflix series, which I loved. After watching it, I started searching for Daredevil comics to read.

From what I have read over the past couple of years, the stories tend to be very hit or miss for me. Regardless of when they were released or who the writers were, I’d say there’s a 50/50 chance of my loving or hating each story arc.

I decided to give this collection a shot after seeing it at my library in the new releases section. It turned out to be mildly entertaining but nothing unique or really enticing.

The story follows Matt Murdock (Daredevil’s true identity) as he works with a lawyer named Frank McGee from the Inhumans to take down Mayor Wilson Fisk (a.k.a. the villain Kingpin) after learning that Fisk bought the election.

McGee puts together a small team to help Murdock/Daredevil find evidence of Fisk’s election tampering. One of these people is named Reader, whose power can make three things become real each day.

One day Daredevil hears a disturbance going on at a bar and decides to see what he can do to help. Once he arrives, however, he’s surprised to meet his fictional brother, Mike Murdock (who I’ve never heard of). With no idea how this “brother” of his has appeared in New York, seemingly really believing he’s Mike Murdock, Daredevil tries to uncover the truth of who Mike Murdock is while simultaneously taking down Mayor Fisk.

This collection comprises issues 606-612 in the Daredevil series. One of my biggest complaints is that, as shocking as Mike Murdock’s appearance is supposed to be, it doesn’t feel like that big of a deal. We barely get to know him at all, which makes any sort of attachment to the character difficult.

A new villain is introduced in this collection, a masked man calling himself The Vigil. He’s a powerful new foe who uses bone daggers to attack his enemies. His powers aren’t anything fancy though, namely strength, speed, and the ability to fight.

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I really enjoy Phil Noto’s art style, and the grittiness of it is very appropriate for Daredevil comics.

Overall, the collection was enjoyable but nothing extraordinary. This was Charles Soule’s last few issues for Daredevil, and it was a sloppy conclusion. If you want to read Daredevil comics, perhaps skip this collection. The art is the best part.


Have you read The Death of Daredevil? What did you think?




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