Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of March 18th, 2020

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.


The Low Low Woods Joe Hill 4

The Low Low Woods #4
DC/Black Label
Cover art by Jenny Frison


witchblade

Witchblade Vol 2 #18
Image/Top Cow
Cover art by Roberta Ingranata


xray robot

X-Ray Robot #1
Dark Horse
Cover art by Chris Samnee & Matthew Wilson


batman covre

Batman Vol 3 #91
DC
Cover art by Francesco Mattina


bitter root 7

Bitter Root #7
Image
Cover art by Eliza Ivanova




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New Comic Book Releases – March 18th, 2020

comic-book-1393153_1280

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s comic book release day! Here are some of the most exciting issues coming out. For a complete list, head over to Midtown Comics.

Not sure where to buy your comics? Check out Comic Shop Locator for shops near you. If you don’t live in an area with a local shop, you can purchase from Midtown Comics, directly from the publisher, or through Comixology if you prefer digital copies.

The highlighted issues are the ones that I’d personally recommend.



Marvel

  • 2020 Iron Age #1 by Tom DeFalco and Nick Roche
  • 2020 Machine Man #2 by Christos N. Gage, Tom DeFalco, Andy MacDonald, and Mike Hawthorne
  • Aero #9 by Zhou Liefen, Amy Chu, and Keng
  • Amazing Mary Jane #6 by Leah Williams and Carlos E. Gomez
  • Atlantis Attacks #3 by Greg Pak and Ario Anindito
  • Captain America Vol 9 #20 by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Robert Quinn
  • Captain Marvel Vol 9 #16 by Kelly Thompson and Lee Garbett
  • Conan the Barbarian Vol 4 #14 by Jim Zub and Roge Antonia
  • Deadpool Vol 7 #4 by Kelly Thompson and Chris Bachalo
  • Excalibur Vol 4 #9 by Tini Howard and Marcus To
  • Fantastic Four Vol 6 #20 by Dan Slott and Paco Medina
  • Ghost-Spider #8 by Seanan McGuire and Ig Guara
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 6 #3 by Al Ewing and Juan Cabal
  • Marvels Avengers: Captain America #1 by Paul Allor and Georges Jeanty
  • Marvels X #3 by Alex Ross, Jim Krueger, and Well-Bee 
  • Morbius #5 by Vita Ayala and Marcelo Ferreira
  • Outlawed #1 by Eve Ewing and Kim Jacinto
  • Runaways Vol 5 #31 by Rainbow Rowell and Andres Genolet
  • Spider-Woman Vol 7 #1 by Karla Pacheco and Pere Perez
  • Star Wars Vol 5 #4 by Charles Soule and Jesus Saiz
  • Valkyrie Jane Foster #9 by Jason Aaron, Torunn Grenbekk, and Ramon Rosanas
  • X-Force Vol 6 #9 by Ben Percy and Joshua Cassara

DC

  • Aquaman Vol 6 #58 by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Robson Rocha
  • Batman Vol 3 #91 by James Tynion IV and Jorge Jimenez
  • DCeased Unkillables #2 by Tom Taylor, Karl Mostert, and Trevor Scott
  • He-Man and the Masters of the Multiverse #5 by Tim Seeley, Dan Fraga, and Richard Friend
  • Justice League Vol 4 #43 by Robert Venditti, Doug Mahnke, and Jaime Mendoza
  • The Low Low Woods by Carmen Maria Machado and Dani
  • Lucifer Vol 3 #18 by Dan Watters and Sebastian Fiumara
  • Nightwing Vol 4 #70 by Dan Jurgens and Ronan Cliquet
  • Plunge #2 by Joe Hill and Stuart Immonen
  • Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 by Marv Wolfman and Tom Grummett
  • Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen Vol 2 #9 by Matt Fraction and Steve Lieber
  • Teen Titans Vol 6 #40 by Adam Glass, Robbie Thompson, and Eduardo Pansica
  • Year of the Villain: Hell Arisen #4 by James Tynion IV and Steve Epting

Image

  • Ascender #10 by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen
  • Bitter Root #7 by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene
  • Die Die Die #9 by Robert Kirkman, Chris Burnham, and Nathan Fairbairn
  • Family Tree #5 by Jeff Lemire and Phil Hester
  • Hardcore Reloaded #4 by Brandon Thomas, Frances Portela, and Leonardo Paciarotti
  • Middlewest #16 by Skottie Young, Jorge Corona, Jean-Francois Beaulieu
  • Spawn #306 by Todd McFarlane and Philip Tan
  • Tartarus #2 by Johnnie Christmas and Jack Cole
  • Undiscovered Country #5 by Charles Soule, Scott Snyder, Giuseppe Camuncoli, and Daniele Orlandini
  • Witchblade Vol 2 #18 by Caitlin Kittredge and Roberta Ingranata

IDW

  • Marvel Action Spider-Man Vol 2 #2 by Brandon Easton and Fico Ossio
  • Star Wars Adventures #31 by Cavan Scott, Michael Moreci, Arianna Florean, and David M Buisan
  • Transformers Vol 4 #19 by Brian Ruckley, Anna Malkova, and Bethany McGuire-Smith
  • Usagi Yojimbo Vol 4 #9 by Stan Sakai

Dark Horse

  • Bang #2 by Matt Kindt and Wilfredo Torres
  • Dragon Age: Blue Wraith #3 by Christina Weir, Nunzio Deflippis, and Michael Atiyeh
  • Grendel: Devil’s Odyssey #4 by Matt Wagner
  • Predator: Hunters III #2 by Chris Warner and Brian Thies
  • Starship Down #1 by Justin Giampaoli and Andrea Mutti
  • X-Ray Robot #1 by Mike Allred



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New Comic Book Releases for November 27th, 2019

comic-book-1393153_1280

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s comic book release day! Here are some of the most exciting issues coming out. For a complete list, head over to Midtown Comics.

Not sure where to buy your comics? Check out Comic Shop Locator for shops near you. If you don’t live in an area with a local shop, you can purchase from Midtown Comics, directly from the publisher, or through Comixology if you prefer digital copies.

The highlighted issues are the ones that I’d personally recommend.



Marvel

  • Avengers Vol 7 #27 by Jason Aaron and Ed McGuiness
  • Black Panther Vol 7 #18 by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Chris Sprouse
  • Conan 2099 One-Shot by Gerry Duggan and Roge Antonio
  • Fallen Angels Vol 2 #2 by Bryan Edward Hill and Szymon Kudranski
  • Fantastic Four: Grand Design #2 by Tom Scioli 
  • Fantastic Four: Negative Zone #1 by Mike Carey, Ryan North, Stefano Caselli, and Steve Uy
  • Ghost-Spider #4 by Seanan McGuire and Takeshi Miyazawa
  • Invisible Woman #5 by Mark Waid and Mattia De Iulis
  • Ironheart #12 by Eve Ewing and Luciano Vecchio
  • New Mutants Vol 4 #2 by Jonathan Hickman, Ed Brisson, and Rod Reis
  • Punisher 2099 One-Shot by Lonnie Nadler, Zac Thompson, and Matt Horak
  • Scream: Curse of Carnage #1 by Clay McCleod Chapman and Chris Mooneyham
  • Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #39 by Simon Spurrier and Caspar Wijngaard
  • Valkyrie Jane Foster #5 by Jason Aaron, Al Ewing, and CAFU
  • Venom Vol 4 #20 by Donny Cates, Jose Carlos Silva, and Iban Coello
  • X-Force Vol 6 #2 by Benjamin Percy and Joshua Cassara
  • Yondu #2 by Lonnie Nadler, Zac Thompson, and John McCrea

 


DC

  • Action Comics Vol 2 #1017 by Brian Michael Bendis, John Romita Jr, and Klaus Janson
  • Basketful of Heads #2 by Joe Hill and Leomacs Dan McDaid
  • Batgirl Vol 5 #41 by Cecil Cascellucci and Carmine Di Giandomenico
  • Batman Beyond Vol 6 #38 by Dan Jurgens and Sean Chen
  • Batman: Creature of the Night #4 by Kurt Busiek and John Paul Leon
  • Batman Giant #2
  • Batman vs Ras Al Ghul #3 by Neal Adams
  • Books of Magic Vol 3 #14 by Kat Howard, Simon Spurrier, and Tom Fowler
  • Detective Comics Vol 2 #1016 by Peter J. Tomasi, Doug Mahnke, and Jaime Mendoza
  • Dollar Comics: Infinite Crisis #1 by Geoff Johns, Phil Jiminez, and Andy Lanning
  • The Flash Vol 5 #83 by Joshua Williamson and Scott Kolins
  • Freedom Fighters Vol 3 #11 by Robert Venditti and Eddy Barrows
  • John Constantine: Hellblazer #1 by Simon Spurrier and Aaron Campbell
  • Justice League Dark Vol 2 #17 
  • The Last God by Philip Kennedy Johnson and Ricardo Federici
  • Looney Toons Vol 3 #252 by Scott Gross
  • Martian Manhunter Vol 5 #10 by Steve Orlando and Riley Rossmo
  • Red Hood Outlaw #40 by Scott Lobdell and Kenneth Rocafort
  • Shazam Vol 2 #8 by Geoff Johns and Dale Eaglesham
  • Supergirl Vol 7 Annual #2 by Robert Venditti and Laura Braga
  • Swamp Thing Giant #2
  • Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Infinite Crisis #1 by James Tynion IV, Aaron Lopresti, and Matt Ryan
  • Terrifics #22 by Gene Luen Yang and Stephen Segovia

Image

  • Ascender #7 by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen
  • Criminal Vol 3 #10 by Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Jacob Phillips
  • Curse Words #25 by Charles Soule and Ryan Brown
  • East of West #44 by Jonathan Hickman and Nick Dragotta
  • Killadelphia #1 by Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander
  • Lazarus Risen #3 by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark
  • Postal Deliverance #5 by Bryan Hill, Matt Hawkins, and Raffaele Ienco

IDW

  • Cobra Kai: The Karate Kid Saga Continues #2 by Denton J. Tipton and Kagan McLeod
  • The Crow: Hark the Herald #1 by Tim Seeley and Meredith Laxton
  • From Hell: Master Edition #8 by Alan Moore and Eddie Cambell
  • Marvel Action Classics: Ant-Man by Fred Van Lente, Todd DeZago, Matteo Lolli, and Derec Aucoin
  • My Little Pony: Holiday Special by James Asmus, Trish Forstner, and Andy Price
  • Sonic the Hedgehog Vol 3 #23 by Ian Flynn and Priscilla Tramontano
  • Star Trek: Picard Countdown #1 by Mike Johnson and Kristen Beyer
  • Star Wars Adventures #28 by John Barber, Michael Moreci, Derek Charm, and Tony Fleecs
  • Transformers Galaxies #3 by Tyler Bleszinski and Livio Ramondelli
  • Uncle Scrooge Vol 2 #51 by Fausto Vitaliano, Pietro B Zemelo, Paolo De Lorenzi, and Roberto Vian

Dark Horse

  • Ether: Disappearance of Violet Bell #3 by Matt Kindt and David Rubin
  • Fight Club 3 #11 by Chuck Palahniuk, Cameron Stewart, and Dave McCaig
  • Invisible Kingdom #7 by G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward
  • Machine Gun Wizards #4 by Christian Ward
  • Witchfinder: The Reign of Darkness #1 by Mike Mignola, Chris Roberson, and Christopher Mitten



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New Comic Book Releases for November 20, 2019

comic-book-1393153_1280

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s comic book release day! Here are some of the most exciting issues coming out. For a complete list, head over to Midtown Comics.

Not sure where to buy your comics? Check out Comic Shop Locator for shops near you. If you don’t live in an area with a local shop, you can purchase from Midtown Comics, directly from the publisher, or through Comixology if you prefer digital copies.

The highlighted issues are the ones that I’d personally recommend.



Marvel

  • 2099 Alpha One Shot by Nick Spencer and Viktor Bogdonovic
  • Absolute Carnage #5 by Donny Cates and Ryan Stegman
  • Absolute Carnage: Captain Marvel #1 by Emily Ryan Lerner and Andrea Broccardo
  • Aero #5 by Zhou Liefen, Greg Pak, Alyssa Wong, and Pop Mhan Keng
  • The Amazing Mary Jane #2 by Leah Williams and Carlos E. Gomez
  • The Amazing Spider-Man Vol 5 #34 by Nick Spencer and Patrick Gleason
  • Annihilation Scourge Alpha #1 by Matthew Rosenberg and Juanan Ramirez
  • Avengers Vol 7 #26 by Jason Aaron and Dale Keown
  • Captain America Vol 9 #16 by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Robert Quinn
  • Captain Marvel Vol 9 #12 by Kelly Thompson and Lee Garbett
  • Conan the Barbarian Vol 4 #11 by Jason Aaron and Mahmud A. Asrar
  • Deadpool Vol 7 #1 by Kelly Thompson and Chris Bachalo
  • Excalibur Vol 4 #2 by Tini Howard and Marcus To
  • Fantastic Four 2099 One-Shot by Karla Pacheco and Steven Cummings
  • Gwenpool Strikes Back #4 by Leah Williams and David Baldeon
  • Immortal Hulk #27 by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, and German Garcia
  • King Thor #3 by Jason Aaron and Esad Ribic
  • Loki Vol 3 #5 by Daniel Kibblesmith and Andy MacDonald
  • Marauders #2 by Gerry Duggan and Matteo Lolli
  • Punisher: Kill Krew #5 by Gerry Duggan and Juan Ferreyra
  • Spider-Man Velocity #4 by Dennis Hopeless Hallum and Emilio Laiso
  • Spider-Verse Vol 3 #2 by Ryan North and Pere Perez
  • Star Wars Vol 4 #75 by Greg Pak and Phil Noto
  • Strikeforce #3 by Tini Howard and German Peralta
  • Tony Stark: Iron Man #18 by Christos Gage, Dan Slott, and Paco Medina

DC

  • Aquaman Vol 6 #54 by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Robson Rocha, and Daniel Henriques
  • Batman Superman Vol 2 #4 by Joshua Williamson and David Marquez
  • Batman Vol 3 #83 by Tom King and Mikel Janin
  • Batman White Knight Presents: Von Freeze #1 by Sean Murphy and Klaus Janson
  • Dial H for Hero #9 by Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones
  • Dollar Comics: Luthor #1 by Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo
  • Flash Forward #3 by Scott Lobdell, Brett Booth, and Norm Rapmund
  • He-Man and the Masters of the Multiverse #1 by Tim Seeley, Dan Fraga, and Richard Friend
  • Infected Scarab #1 by Dennis Hopeless and Freddie Williams II
  • Justice League Vol 4 #36 by Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, and Francis Manapul
  • Lucifer Vol 3 #14 by Dan Watters and Fernando Blanco
  • Metal Men Vol 4 #2 by Dan Didio, Shane Davis, and Michelle Delecki
  • Nightwing Vol 4 #66 by Dan Jurgens and Ronan Cliquet
  • Question the Deaths of Vic Sage #1 by Jeff Lemire and Dennis Cowan
  • Supergirl Vol 7 #36 by Marc Andreyko, Eduardo Pansica, and Julio Ferreira
  • Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen Vol 2 #5 by Matt Fraction and Steve Lieber
  • Teen Titans Vol 6 #36 by Adam Glass and Bernard Chang
  • Titans: Burning Rage #4 by Dan Jurgens, Scott Eaton, and Wayne Faucher
  • Wonder Woman: Come Back to Me #5 by Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti, and Tom Derenick

Image

  • Crowded #10 by Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt
  • Farmhand #11 by Rob Guillory and Taylor Wells
  • Heart Attack #1 by Shawn Kittelsen, Eric Zawadzki, and Michael Garland
  • Ice Cream Man #16 by W. Maxwell Prince, Martin Morazzo, and Chris O’Halloran
  • Marked #2 by David Hine, Brian Haberlin, and Geirrod Van Dyke
  • Olympia #1 by Curt Pires, Tony Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cunniffe
  • Outer Darkness #12 by John Layman and Afu Chan
  • Pretty Violent #4 by Derek Hunter and Jason Young
  • SFSX (Safe Sex) #3 by Tina Horn and Alajandra Gutierrez
  • The Weatherman Vol 2 #5 by Jody LeHeup and Nathan Fox

IDW

  • Big Hero 6: The Series #1 by Hannah Blumenreich and Nicoletta Baldari
  • Canto #6 by David M. Booher and Drew Zucker
  • Disney Comics & Stories #8 by Enrico Faccini
  • Eve Stranger #4 by David Barnett and Philip Bond
  • GLOW vs the Babyface #1 by Aimee Garcia, AJ Mendez, and Hannah Templer
  • Marvel Action: Black Panther #6 by Vita Ayala and Arianna Florean
  • My Little Pony: Feats of Friendship #3 by Ian Flynn and Tony Fleecs
  • Star Trek: Discovery: Aftermath #3 by Kirsten Beyer, Mike Johnson, and Tony Shasteen
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Urban Legends #19 by Gary Carlson and Frank Fosco

Dark Horse

  • American Gods: Moment of the Storm #7 by Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell
  • Count Crowley: Reluctant Midnight Monster Hunter #2 by David Dastmalchain and Lukas Ketner
  • Disney Frozen True Treasure #1 by Joe Caramanga, Studio Kawaii, and Eduard Petrovich
  • Hazel and Cha Cha Save Christmas: Tales from the Umbrella Academy by Gerard Way, Scot Allie, Tommy Lee Edwards, and John Workman
  • Mask: I Pledge Allegiance to the Mask #2 by Christopher Cantwell and Patric Reynolds
  • Steeple #3 by John Allison and Sarah Stern
  • Strayed #4 by Carlos Giffoni and Juan Doe



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Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War by Mike Johnson – A Review

Star Trek Green Lantern the Spectrum War

Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War by Mike Johnson
Art by Ángel Hernández
Science Fiction | Superheroes | Comic Books
Published by IDW Publishing
Released April 12th, 2016
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_3_and_a_half_stars

If you’ve been reading this blog for any amount of time, you know I’m obsessed with all things Star Trek. Something else you should know is that the only DC Comics series I care for at all is Green Lantern. So, naturally, this 6-issue comic book series caught my eye.

The Spectrum War brings the Green Lantern universe into Star Trek’s Kelvin timeline after the Lanterns are decimated by Nekron, aka death. Ganthet, a guardian of the universe, uses a last-ditch effort to save the remaining Lanterns called The Last Light, essentially throwing anyone still living into an alternate reality.

Star Trek Green Lantern art1.jpg

Note: For anyone not familiar with Star Trek, the Kelvin Timeline is that of the newer films, Star Trek, Star Trek Beyond, and Star Trek Into Darkness.

Rings of all emotional spectrums end up in this new universe, with three of the rings ending up with Starfleet officers aboard the USS Enterprise, and the rest going to some old Star Trek enemies. Hal Jordan and the remaining lanterns assist Captian Kirk in fighting the Klingons, Romulans, and Gorn, but make a startling realization that they were not the only ones to cross over into this new universe: Nekron followed them.

The USS Enterprise fights alongside the Lanterns to defeat Nekron, and things are looking grim until they realize that they have a secret weapon that could change the fight for good.

I really enjoyed this series. While I am not a fan of the Star Trek Kelvin timeline and wish this series focused on the Star Trek: The Original Series crew, I tried to overlook that. The story itself is really fun and it was interesting to see which Star Trek characters the Lanterns’ rings chose to wear them.

star trek green lantern art2

The climax of the story and the ensuing battle between Star Fleet, the Lanterns, and Nekron felt too short for how epic it should have felt. Six issues don’t give the writer much freedom, however, so I get it – I just wish there had been more of a fight.

The art, drawn by Ángel Hernández, is wonderful. Lots of color and emotion contained within the panels, which made the entire series more enjoyable.

To read this series, I’d say you just need general knowledge of Star Trek, but you might want to know a bit more about the Green Lantern series. If you’re not familiar with Green Lantern, it might get a bit confusing as to how the rings work and what they represent because it is never explicitly explained.

This series was really enjoyable, although far from perfect. There were times when the story felt a little thin, but overall it was fun watching the crew of the USS Enterprise work together with Hal Jordan and some of the other Lanterns. There is a sequel to this series, called Stranger Worlds, that I’ll be reviewing soon as well.


Have you read any of the Star Trek crossover comics? Are you a Green Lantern fan? Let me know in the comments!




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Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther by Nnedi Okorafor – A Review

Shuri Vol 1 cover

Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther by Nnedi Okorafor
Illustrated by Leonardo Romero
Coloring by Jordie Bellaire
Comic Book | Science Fiction | Superheroes
Published by Marvel
Released May 7th, 2019
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_2_stars

I wanted to like this collection so badly, but it just… wasn’t good.

When I saw that Marvel’s Shuri series was going to be written by science-fiction writer Nnedi Okorafor, I added it to my TBR immediately. I’ve read Okorafor’s Binti, and although I didn’t love that novella, I was intrigued enough by her writing to want to give some of her other work a shot.

Nnedi Okorafor
Nnedi Okorafor

In the Marvel comics world, Shuri was never a prominent character until quite recently. While she at one point took over the role of Black Panther from her brother and played parts in several storylines, she wasn’t ever the center of the story.

With the success of Marvel’s Black Panther film, that’s changed. Which is great! I loved the Black Panther movie and Shuri’s character was delightful. I’m always going to root for a fun, brilliant, female scientist. I wasn’t surprised to see Marvel releasing a Shuri-centric comic book series in the film’s wake.

It didn’t take long into the story to start to realize that Shuri, Vol. 1: The Search for Black Panther wasn’t going to live up to my expectations.

The very first thing I noticed was the atrocious artwork, which you can see below. The art itself was done by Leonardo Romero with the coloring being done by Jordie Bellaire. I don’t know whether to fault the artist or the colorist for this or perhaps both of them:

shuri-nnedi-okorafor-artwork-1.jpg

It’s just bad. There’s no shading or defining of the character’s faces. It’s blocky and made up mainly of primary colors. There’s no depth to it. The artwork turned me off of this collection before the story even started. Comic books are a medium that depends on the art just as much as the story, and I was surprised to see such a lack of quality in a comic book series that has the potential of attracting new fans.

As a quick side note, the covers for this series were done by a different (and better) artist named Sam Spratt. The covers of all of these issues are gorgeous.

Shuri 2 cover.jpg
One of Sam Spratt’s covers

The story takes place after T’Challa, aka Black Panther, takes off into space for an unknown mission. He’s essentially disappeared, and no one is sure how to bring him back. In the meantime, Shuri is approached by her mother and by a secret organization of African leaders and is asked to take on the role of Black Panther until her brother returns.

That’s only one part of this story. The other part is Shuri and friends trying to defeat a giant space insect who eats music and excretes black holes.

The story did absolutely nothing for me. Like the artwork, it was simplistic and one-dimensional. It also required previous knowledge of the characters, especially since Shuri is followed around by multi-dimensional beings and/or ghosts called the ancestors that sprang from a previous series. As I mentioned before, the creation of this series, at least on Marvel’s end, had to have been to attract some movie fans into the comics world, and it can be intimidating to readers when there’s so much of the backstory not explained.

Another issue I had is that there was so much nonsense going on that Shuri’s personality faded into the background. She can be a more interesting character than this series presents her as.

I’m going to give Nnedi Okorafor’s writing one more chance, mainly because I own a copy of her novel Akata Witch. However, I’m starting to think her writing just doesn’t mesh with me. Aside from that, the art in this collection is just terrible. I can’t recommend this series, but I guess if you’re a huge Shuri fan you might still want to read it. I won’t be continuing with this series.


Have you read Shuri, Vol 1? What did you think? Let me know in the comments.


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Dead Man Logan, Vol. 1: Sins of the Father by Ed Brisson – A Review

Dead man Logan ed brisson.jpg

Dead Man Logan, Vol. 1: Sins of the Father
Written by Ed Brisson
Art by Mike Henderson
Comic Book | Superheroes
Published by Marvel Comics
Released June 25th, 2019
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_3_stars

Dead Man Logan is a follow-up series to the much more popular Old Man Logan series. When we encounter Logan (Wolverine) for the first time in this collection, we learn that he’s dying due to the adamantium in his body slowly poisoning him. Before he dies, however, he’s out on a mission to kill the supervillains responsible for taking over the world in his own universe.

Let’s back up a little, in case you haven’t read or aren’t familiar with the Old Man Logan series. In that series, we follow Logan (Wolverine/James Howlett) in one of Marvel’s alternate universes, this one called Earth-807128. (Marvel’s normal timeline is Earth-616.) In all the ways that count, Earth-807128’s Logan is identical to the Wolverine that we’re all familiar with: the adamantium skeleton, the claws (snikt!), and the incredible healing factor.

For a review and more information about Old Man Logan, read my review of the first collection of issues. Essentially, however, Logan lives in a post-apocalyptic wasteland where the supervillains of the world have united and won. The United States has been divided up between the Hulk Clan, Kingpin, Doom, and Red Skull. Logan and his family live on a small farm in Hulkland, where he tries to lead a normal life while blaming himself for the death of the X-Men.

NOV180955.jpeg

That’s essentially all you need to know to go into Dead Man Logan. 

One of the biggest things that bugged me about Dead Man Logan is that the art, which is done well by artist Mike Henderson, isn’t dark enough for the story. It’s too colorful and cartoony for a story about Logan’s illness and his mission to prevent a terrible war before it has a chance to occur.

While the plot itself was an interesting concept, the execution of it was a bit lacking of substance. For one thing, it was incredibly predictable. There were only one or two moments in the entire collection that I wasn’t expecting, and that made it rather boring to read. Also, why did writer Ed Brisson turn Hawkeye into a huge douchebag? I hate the direction they’ve taken with Hawkeye’s character over the past few years, and the insults to him in this series is obnoxious. There are a ton of jokes along the lines of no one knowing who Hawkeye is, his not having any superpowers, being useless, etc. However, this isn’t exactly true, as Hawkeye was one of the earliest members of the Avengers and has done a lot of amazing and heroic things throughout Marvel’s history.

(Side note: Hawkeye is one of my boyfriend’s favorite Marvel characters, so I’ve learned a lot about his history and personality over the past two years.) 

As always, I’m not going to give away spoilers, but at the end of the collection, Logan meets someone he’s only heard about, and that was probably my favorite part of the entire story.

In the end, there was too much that I didn’t enjoy in this collection for me to give it more than three stars. As I said before, the plot of the story was interesting but it’s execution was not well-down. Logan’s revenge could have taken a much more interesting track than it did in Dead Man Logan. 


Have you read Dead Man Logan, Vol. 1? What did you think? Let us know in the comments!




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Old Man Logan by Mark Millar – A Review

Old Man Logan Mark Millar.jpg

Wolverine: Old Man Logan by Mark Millar
Art by Steve McNiven
Comic Book | Superheroes
Published by Marvel Comics
Released November 11th, 2009
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_5_stars

I could easily sum this review up in one sentence: This collection was perfect.

I’ve been hearing about Mark Millar’s Old Man Logan for years, but never actually picked it up. However, I was at the library a couple of weeks ago and while there, decided to take a look at the graphic novels shelves. This collection immediately caught my eye, so I took it home.

And gosh darn, this series is amazing.

Old Man Logan is set in an alternate universe, Earth-807128, rather than Marvel’s normal Earth-616 universe. In this reality, the supervillains have won, and taken over the world. The United States has been split up between the Hulk Gang, Kingpin, Doctor Doom, and Red Skull.

Earth 807128 map

The supervillains were able to win after the “night the heroes fell,” although no one really knows the details of that night. What happened to Wolverine is just as mysterious, as he disappeared and no one has seen or heard from him in fifty years.

When we meet Logan in this series, he’s living on a farm with his wife and two children in Hulkland, just trying to survive. He’s retired as Wolverine and has made a vow to no longer fight.

One day Hawkeye approaches Logan and asks for his help transporting something across the country, a mission that will pay well enough for Logan to pay the rent on his farm for a long time. By this time, Hawkeye is nearly blind, and Logan tells him that he will not do any fighting. Together, they make the trip and encounter a lot of horrors along the way.

This story was incredible and kept me engaged the entire time. I’ve read some of Mark Millar’s other stuff and it’s all been good, but this collection really blew my mind. This version of Logan is the same as the one who eventually travels to Marvel’s Earth-616 universe, so anyone who reads the normal Marvel timeline comics needs to read this collection to get a better understanding of Old Man Logan’s backstory.

When we find out the truth about what happened the night Wolverine disappeared, it’s truly tragic and heartbreaking. It also explains why he’s decided to no longer fight. Even though this all takes place in an alternate reality, it carries over to Marvel’s “real world” and has a number of implications that affect those storylines.

The art, done by Steve McNiven, was also wonderful, and dark enough for this sort of story.

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If you’re a fan of Marvel or Wolverine, this tragic story is a must-read. The story combines the depth of one of Marvel’s best characters with a Mad Max-setting to create something truly unique where the heroes fail and the villains have won.


Have you read Old Man Logan? What did you think? Let us know in the comments!




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Storm by Eric Jerome Dickey – A Review

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Storm by Eric Jerome Dickey
Collects Storm #1-6
Art by David Yardin & Lan Medina
Comic Book | Superheroes
Published by Marvel Comics
Released on January 16th, 2008
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_2_stars

The X-Men’s Storm is one of my favorite Marvel characters; probably in my top five. So, when I saw this collection at my local library, I definitely wanted to read it.

I had never heard of this series before, which isn’t that weird considering how many X-Men comics Marvel has come out with in the last fifty years. Storm is the story of Ororo Munroe growing up in Africa as a member of a band of thieves and orphans. She’s a master lockpick and is learning how to control her burgeoning powers.

One day, Storm steals a camera from a tourist at the prompting of her peers. In the process, her powers manifest as she gets away. However, the man she steals the camera from isn’t just any tourist; he’s on the lookout for a “Windwalker” such as Storm, and from then on tries to capture her at any cost.

At first glance, it’s a decent premise. However, that part of the story seems to be secondary to the main plot, which is Storm (Ororo) wanting to become a woman and losing her virginity to Black Panther (T’Challa). That’s one of the reasons I rated this collection two stars – we don’t need a comic book series focusing on that topic. Also, I found it very off-putting that Storm’s character was written in such a way that the only way she can truly feel like a woman is through sex.

Another issue I took with this series is that it isn’t canon. This collection proposes that the first time Ororo and T’Challa meet is when she’s a teenager and he rescues her from her would-be captors. In reality, however, (well, in Marvel’s Earth-616 reality), it’s actually Ororo that aids in rescuing T’Challa after he’s kidnapped. Their romance is canon, but it didn’t happen as written in Storm and, again, is it really necessary to make one of the main plots in this series about her losing her virginity just so that she can feel like more of a woman? No. The answer to that is no.

The art is fine, not a favorite of mine or anything spectacular. The cover art was a bit off-putting, but that’s a personal preference.

Storm is a wonderful and very complex character in Marvel’s universe, but this collection reduces her to being nothing more than a boy-obsessed normal teenager. Skip it and just read some classic X-Men.


What is your favorite Storm or X-Men comic series? Let me know in the comments!




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Deadpool vs. Carnage by Cullen Bunn – A Review

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Deadpool vs. Carnage by Cullen Bunn
Art by Salvador Espin, Mike Henderson, & Kim Jacinto
Comic Book | Superhero
Published by Marvel
Released September 9, 2014
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_2_and_a_half_stars

I want to like Deadpool, but what I’ve read of his character so far I’m just not feeling. My boyfriend keeps telling me that Deadpool’s character when he was first created – when he was a very NSFW, brutal, insane, and very much not silly mercenary – is considerably better than story arcs that have been published in the last decade, especially since the movie was released.

This collection is exactly what you’d expect, which is Deadpool fighting Carnage. That sounded awesome to me, as I’d never seen those two characters go after one another before, but the execution of it was poor.

Basically, Carnage breaks out of prison and goes on a random murder spree, which is nothing new for him. After all, Carnage is an insane mass murderer. Deadpool learns of Carnage’s rampage while watching television and decides that he can find Carnage, so he sets out, following a pattern that only he can discern, and tries to find Carnage.

As far as the plot goes, this one is fine. The execution of it, however, left a lot to be desired.

Let’s start out with some positives. The pacing of the story is good, and it’s easy to read. I feel that people who like modern Deadpool – the silly, meme-y version, might enjoy this story arc more than I did. Also, Cullen Bunn’s writing is fine. While I didn’t enjoy many of the jokes, the story was easy to understand and it was wrapped up nicely.

Also, the art, which was done by Kim Jacinto, Mike Henderson, and Salva Espin, was good. Not the best I’ve ever seen, but good.

Okay, now for the rest. My biggest complaint with this collection was that Deadpool and Carnage were essentially the same characters – they were both telling the same jokes, and seemed to have exactly the same personality. While Carnage and Deadpool do have some similarities, such as murdering for fun and being insane, they are far from being the same. I feel like if you were to switch their dialogue with one another, the story wouldn’t really change.

I didn’t enjoy reading this story arc. The only reason I finished it is because it’s very short – 120 pages – meaning I could finish the whole thing in roughly half an hour. I want to like Deadpool, but I think I’m going to have to go back and read some pre-2000s Deadpool to get to know his character a little better.

In the end, I’d recommend skipping this story arc. It doesn’t have much to do with any other story, so it’s not essential reading, and there are much better comic book collections that you can pick up with both characters.


Have you read Deadpool vs. Carnage? What were your thoughts? Do you have any Deadpool comics you’d recommend? Let me know in the comments!




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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of August 28, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Normally I only post the five best covers of the week, but there was absolutely no way I could narrow it down this time. Therefore, here are the ten best comic book covers of the week.


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #18
Art by Marcos Martin
Marvel


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Stranger Things Six #4
Art by Christian Ward
Dark Horse


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Marvel Comics #1000
Art by Jen Bartel
Marvel


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Tommy Gun Wizards #1
Art by Christian Ward
Dark Horse


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House of X #3
Art by Sara Pichelli
Marvel


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #18
Art by Alan Davis
Marvel


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Martian Manhunter Vol 5 #8
Art by Joshua Middleton
DC


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Black Panther Vol 7 #15
Art by Daniel Acuna
Marvel


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House of X #3
Art by Mahmud Asrar
Marvel


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Ascender #5
Art by Dustin Nguyen
Image




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New Comic Book Releases for August 28, 2019

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It’s Wednesday, which means it’s comic book release day! Here are some of the most exciting issues coming out. For a complete list, head over to Midtown Comics.

Not sure where to buy your comics? Check out Comic Shop Locator for shops near you. If you don’t live in an area with a local shop, you can purchase from Midtown Comics, directly from the publisher, or through Comixology if you prefer digital copies.

The highlighted issues are the ones that I’d personally recommend.



Marvel

  • Absolute Carnage #2 by Donny Cates and Ryan Stegman
  • Absolute Carnage Lethal Protectors #1 by Frank Tieri and Flaviano Armentaro
  • Absolute Carnage Miles Morales #1 by Saladin Ahmed and Federico Vincentini
  • Amazing Spider-Man Venom 3D #1 by David Michelinie and Todd McFarlane
  • Amazing Spider-Man Vol 5 #28 by Nick Spencer and Kev Walker
  • Avengers Vol 7 #23 by Jason Aaron and Stefano Caselli
  • Black Panther Vol 7 #15 by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Daniel Acuna
  • Captain America Vol 9 #13 by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jason Masters, and Sean Izaakse
  • Doctor Strange Vol 5 #18 by Mark Waid and Barry Kitson
  • Fantastic Four 4 Yancy Street #1 by Gerry Duggan, Greg Smallwood, and Luciano Vecchio
  • Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man Vol 2 #11 by Tom Taylor and Juan Cabal
  • House of X #3 by Jonathan Hickman and Pepe Larraz
  • Marvel Comics #1000 by various
  • Marvel Monsters #1 by Cullen Bunn and Scott Hepburn
  • Marvel Team-Up Vol 4 #5 by Clint McElroy and Ig Guara
  • Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #46 by Brandon Montclare and Alitha Martinez
  • Power Pack Grow Up #1 by Louise Simonson, June Brigman, and Gurihiru
  • Runaways Vol 5 #24 by Rainbow Rowell and Andres Genolet
  • She-Hulk Vol 3 Annual #1 by various
  • Spider-Man Life Story #6 by Chip Zdarsky and Mark Bagley
  • Spider-Man Velocity #1 by Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum and Emilio Laiso
  • Star Wars Age of Resistance General Hux #1 by Tom Taylor and Leonard Kirk
  • Star Wars Age of Resistance Poe Dameron #1 by Tom Taylor and Ramon Rosanas
  • Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge #5 by Ethan Sacks and Will Sliney
  • Thanos Vol 3 #5 by Tini Howard and Ariel Olivetti
  • Venom Vol 4 #17 by Donny Cates and Iban Coello

DC

  • Action Comics Vol 2 #1014 by Brian Michael Bendis and Szymon Kudranski
  • Batgirl Vol 5 #38 by Cecil Castellucci and Carmine Di Giandomenico
  • Batman Beyond Vol 6 #35 by Dan Jurgens, Rick Leonardi, and Ande Parks
  • Batman Curse of the White Knight #2 by Sean Murphy
  • Batman Superman Vol 2 #1 by Joshua Williamson and David Marquez
  • Books of Magic Vol 3 #11 by Kat Howard, Tom Fowler, and Brian Churilla
  • Detective Comics Vol 2 #1010 by Peter J. Tomasi and Christian Duce
  • Dial H for HERO #6 by Sam Humphries and Joe Quinones
  • Flash Vol 5 #77 by Joshua Williamson and Rafa Sandoval
  • Freedom Fighters Vol 3 #8 by Robert Venditti, Bruno Redondo, and Carlos Ferreira
  • Justice League Dark Vol 2 #14 by James Tynion IV, Daniel Sampere, and Raul Fernandez
  • Justice League Vol 4 #30 by James Tynion IV, Scott Snyder, and Javi Fernandez
  • Martian Manhunter Vol 5 #8 by Steve Orlando and Riley Rossmo
  • Red Hood Outlaw #37 by Scott Lobdell and Pete Woods
  • Terrifics #19 by Gene Luen Yang and Stephen Segovia
  • Wonder Woman Vol 5 #77 by G. Willow Wilson and Jesus Merino

Image

  • Ascender #5 by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen
  • Black Science #42 by Rick Remender, Matteo Scalera, and Moreno DiNisio
  • Ice Cream Man #14 by W. Maxwell Prince, Martin Morazzo, and Chris O’Halloran

IDW

  • Disney Afternoon Giant #6 by Ian Brill and Leonel Castellani
  • Ducktales Silence and Science #1 by Steve Behling and Luca Usai
  • GI Joe A Real American Hero #266 by Larry Hama and Robert Atkins
  • GLOW #4 by Tini Howard and Hannah Templer
  • Mountainhead #1 by John Lees and Ryan Lee
  • My Little Pony Friendship is Magic #81 by Thom Zahler and Nicoletta Baldari
  • Sonic the Hedgehog Vol 3 #20 by Ian Flynn and Jack Lawrence
  • Star Pig #2 by Delilah S Dawson and Francesco Gaston
  • Star Trek Year Five #5 by Jody Houser and Silvia Califano
  • Tangled the Series: Hair it Is by Leigh Dragoon, Kate Cook, and Rosa La Barbera
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder in Hell #4 by Mateus Santolouco
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Urban Legends #16 by Gary Carlson and Frank Fosco
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Vol 5 #97 by Tom Waltz, Kevin Eastman, and Michael Dialynas
  • Transformers Vol 4 #11 by Brian Ruckley, Andrew Griffith, and Bethany McGuire-Smith
  • Uncle Scrooge Vol 2 #48 by Vito Stabile, Pietro B Zemelo, and Frederico Franzo

Dark Horse

  • Fight Club 3 #8 by Chuck Palahniuk, Cameron Stewart, and Dave McCaig
  • Manor Black #2 by Cullen Bunn, Brian Hurtt, and Tyler Crook
  • Stranger Things Six #4 by Jody Houser and Edgar Salazar
  • Tommy Gun Wizards #1 by Christian Ward



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Best Comic Book Covers for the Week of August 14th, 2019

One of my favorite things about comic book release day is seeing all of the wonderful cover art.

Here are the five best covers of the week.


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Silver Surfer Black #3
Art by Tradd Moore


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Captain Marvel Vol 9 #9
Art by Mark Brooks


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Doctor Strange Vol 5 #17
Art by Emanuela Lupacchino


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Wonder Woman Vol 5 #76
Art by Jenny Frison


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Powers of X #2
Art by Patrick Zircher




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New Comic Book Releases for August 14, 2019

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It’s Wednesday, which means it’s comic book release day! Here are some of the most exciting issues coming out. For a complete list, head over to Midtown Comics.

Not sure where to buy your comics? Check out Comic Shop Locator for shops near you. If you don’t live in an area with a local shop, you can purchase from Midtown Comics, directly from the publisher, or through Comixology if you prefer digital copies.

The highlighted issues are the ones that I’d personally recommend.



Marvel

  • Absolute Carnage Scream # 1 by Cullen Bunn and Gerardo Sandoval
  • Absolute Carnage Separation Anxiety #1 by Clay Chapman and Brian Level
  • Age of Conan: Valeria #1
  • Amazing Spider-Man Vol 5 #27 by Nick Spencer and Kev Walker
  • Captain Marvel Vol 9 #9 by Kelly Thompson and Carmen Nunez Carnero
  • Conan the Barbarian Exodus #1
  • Doctor Strange Vol 5 #17 by Mark Waid, Barry Kitson, and Scott Koblish
  • Fantastic Four Vol 6 #13 by Dan Slott and Sean Izaakse
  • Friend Neighborhood Spider-Man Vol 2 #10 by Tom Taylor and Ken Lashley
  • Gwenpool Strikes Back #1 by Leah Williams and David Baldeon
  • Invaders Vol 3 #8 by Chip Zdarsky, Carlos Magno, and Butch Guice
  • Ironheart #9 by Eve Ewing and Luciano Vecchio
  • Loki Vol 3 #2 by Daniel Kibblesmith 
  • Miles Morales Spider-Man #9 by Saladin Ahmed and Javi Garron
  • Powers of X #2 by Jonathan Hickman and R.B. Silva
  • Punisher Kill Krew #1 by Gerry Duggan and Juan Ferreyra
  • Silver Surfer Black #3 by Donny Cates and Tradd Moore
  • Silver Surfer Prodigal Sun #1 by Peter David and Francesco Manna
  • Star Wars Target Vader #2 by Robbie Thompson and Marc Laming
  • Sword Master #2 by Shuizhu and Gunji
  • Symbiote Spider-Man #5 by Peter David and Greg Land
  • Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Vol 2 #47 by Ryan North and Derek Charm

DC

  • Batman and the Outsiders Vol 3 #4 by Bryan Hill and Dexter Soy
  • Batman Universe #2 by Brian Michael Bendis and Nick Derington
  • Catwoman Vol 5 #14 by V. Ram and Mirka Andolfo
  • Collapser #2 by Mikey Way, Shaun Simon, and Ilias Kyriazis
  • Detective Comics Vol 2 #1009 by Peter J. Tomasi and Christian Duce
  • Event Leviathan #3 by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev
  • Flash Vol 5 #76 by Joshua Williamson, Rafa Sandoval, and Jordi Tarragona
  • Hawkman Vol 5 #15 by Robert Venditti, Pat Olliffe, and Tom Palmer
  • House of Whispers #12 by Nalo Hopkinson, Dan Watters, and Dominike “Domo” Stanton
  • Justice League Odyssey #12 by Dan Abnett and Will Conrad
  • Titans Burning Rage #1 by Dan Jurgens, Scott Eaton, Wayne Faucher
  • Wonder Woman Vol 5 #76 by G. Willow Wilson and Lee Garbett

Image

  • Analog #7 by Gerry Duggan and David O’Sullivan
  • Gideon Falls #16 by Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Dave Stewart
  • Gogor #4 by Ken Garing
  • Hit-Girl Vol 2 Season 2 #7 by Daniel Way and Goran Parlov
  • Oblivion Song #18 by Robert Kirkman, Lorenzo De Felici, and Annalisa Leoni
  • Outer Darkness #9 by John Layman and Afu Chan
  • Reaver #2 by Justin Jordan, Rebekah Isaacs, and Alex Guimaraes
  • Rumble Vol 2 #15 by John Arcudi and David Rubin
  • Sharkey the Bounty Hunter #5 by Mark Millar and Simone Bianchi
  • Sonata #3 by David Hine, Brian Haberlin, and Geirrod Van Dyke
  • Unearth #2 by Cullen Bunn, Kyle Strahm, and Baldemar Rivas
  • Unnatural #12 by Mirka Andolfo
  • The Warning by Edward Laroche
  • The White Trees #1 by Chip Zdarsky and Kris Anka

IDW

  • My Little Pony Spirit of the Forest #3 by Ted Anderson and Brenda Hickey
  • Road of Bones #4 by Rich Douek and Alex Cormack
  • Star Trek Year Five #4 by Brandon Easton and Martin Coccolo
  • Usagi Yojimbo Vol 4 #3 by Stan Sakai

Dark Horse

  • Black Hammer of Justice League Hammer of Justice by Jeff Lemire and Michael Walse
  • Critical Role Vox Machina Origins Series II #2 by Jody Houser and Olivia Samson Msassyk
  • Joe Golem Occult Detective Conjurors #4 by Mike Mignola, Chris Golden, Peter Bergting, and Michelle Madsen
  • The Orville #2 by David Goodman, David Cabeza, and Michael Atiyeh
  • She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot #5 by Christopher Cantwell, Martin Morazzo, and Miroslav Mrva
  • Sword Daughter #8 by Brian Wood, Mack Chater, and Jose Villarrubia



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Doctor Strange: A Separate Reality by Steve Englehart – A Review

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Doctor Strange: A Separate Reality by Steve Englehart
Illustrated by Frank Brunner
Comic Books | Fantasy
Published by Marvel Comics
Released April 29, 2002, First Published in 1974
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_5_stars

Doctor Strange has been my favorite Marvel character since my boyfriend first introduced me to the comic book world. It’s no surprise really, as I love magic and the occult and trippy 60s/70s art, all of which Doctor Strange comics contain.

Doctor Strange: A Separate Reality is a collection of Doctor Strange comics from 1974 – Marvel Premiere Vol. 1 #9-14 and Doctor Strange Vol. 2 #1-5. In this collection, Doctor Strange, along with help from Clea and Wong, fight against the dark forces of Sise-Neg and Silver Dagger.

While I’m pretty up to date on modern Doctor Strange comics (with the exception of the currently-running Mark Waid series, because as much as I adore Doctor Strange, I’m really not a fan of Waid’s writing), I still have so much to read when it comes to the older comics.

This collection has some important moments in the overall life of Doctor Strange, and as such is a must-read for any fan of his.  I’m not going to say too much as to the plot, because I went into this blind and I think it’s the best way to do so. What I will say is that this collection contains both Doctor Strange becoming Sorcerer Supreme and achieving immortality.

The stories contained in A Separate Reality are really fantastic. Steve Englehart did a fabulous job of showing all sides of a complicated character and pacing the story in such a way that it is incredibly enjoyable and deep at the same time. That’s something that is not always easy in comic books since each issue is usually less than thirty pages. There is so much contained in these pages that it’s damn impressive how much story Englehart managed to write.

And then we have the art, which is so amazing. Before reading this collection, I wasn’t really familiar with the name Frank Brunner, but I will be searching out some of his other work for sure! It’s colorful and trippy and the perfect example of why I love Doctor Strange comics so much. Here are a few examples:

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If you’re already a Doctor Strange fan or if you’re new to his character and want a great example of why he’s one of the best Marvel heroes, A Separate Reality will be a great place to start.


Have you read Doctor Strange: A Separate Reality? What did you think? Let me know in the comments!


Want more Doctor Strange?

Doctor Strange: The Fate of Dreams | Doctor Strange: The Oath




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