Break Your Glass Slippers by Amanda Lovelace – A Review

break your glass slippers amanda lovelace

Break Your Glass Slippers by Amanda Lovelace
Poetry | Feminist | Retellings
Published by Andrews McNeel Publishing
Release Date: March 17th, 2020
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_4_stars

Note: I received an electronic arc of this collection from NetGalley. This in no way affects my opinions.

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I’ve never been a huge fan of poetry, despite often trying to love it. Classic poetry tends to either go right over my head or it’s so flowery that I struggle to enjoy it, and modern poetry’s “edginess” tends to annoy me.

Browsing Netgalley this morning, I came across Amanda Lovelace’s newest poetry collection, Break Your Glass Slippers, and thought I’d give it a shot. I’d heard from friends and the online book community that Lovelace’s works are really good.

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Amanda Lovelace

Break Your Glass Slippers is a modern, feminist collection of poetry inspired by the classic fairytale, Cinderella. Lovelace uses the classic story to show the reader that changing who you are in order to please your “prince” is not a requirement of deserving love. Learning how to love yourself first, being supportive of other women rather than feeling jealousy at what they have and you don’t, going after your own dreams… all are topics that Lovelace touches upon, as well as many others.

The layout of this collection was beautiful. Since I read an ARC of the collection rather than the finished copy, which is scheduled to be released mid-March, I’m not sure how much things will stay the same. In between sections in the collection, there were pages of a beautiful, illustrated moonscape, and some of the poems had cute illustrations. I hope these features will remain in the final version.

A lot of the poems resonated with me on a personal level, and I feel that many women will feel the same. I can see myself gifting Break Your Glass Slippers to my female friends. When it’s finally released, I hope so many other people will pick it up and fall in love with it just as I did.


Have you read any of Amanda Lovelace’s other collections? What did you think of them?




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The (Other) F Word edited by Angie Manfredi – A Review

The Other F Word Angie Manfredi

The (Other) F Word: A Celebration of the Fat and Fierce
Edited by Angie Manfredi
Nonfiction | Essay Collection | Body Positivity | Young Adult
Published by Amulet Books
Released September 24th, 2019
Goodreads | Amazon
Rating: 5_Star_Rating_System_5_stars

Note: I received a free, unsolicited edition from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affects my opinion.

 The (Other) F Word is the type of book that I wish I had discovered in high school. It would have given me more confidence and shown me that it’s okay to love your body, regardless of its size.

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S. Qiouyi Lu

I’m fat. For most of my life, I’ve been overweight. I was the fat kid in school, and I’ve always had an unhealthy relationship with food and my weight. It’s been worse in the past few years, as I lost a drastic amount of weight in my early twenties (over a hundred pounds) and then gained it all back. That experience caused a great deal of discomfort with my body, as I felt like it betrayed me. I viewed it as a win when I lost the weight (which happened during a bipolar manic episode where I literally became obsessed with exercise in a shockingly unhealthy way), and as I gained it back (starting with a depressive episode) I felt like an absolute failure.

It’s only relatively recently that I’ve started learning how to love my body again and this collection of essays helped to give my confidence a boost. While The Other (F) Word is technically meant for teenagers, everyone struggling with their weight or who identify as fat will get some benefit from reading it.

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Saucyé West

While I’m not going to make a full list of each writer included in the collection, some prominent names include Julie Murphy, Alex Gino, P.S. Kaguya, Lily Anderson, S. Qiouyi Lu, Virgie TovarSaucyé West, and Ady Del Valle. Their contributions range from essays to poetry to illustrations and art.

It would take too long to review each essay, but suffice it to say that I gained a lot from reading through this entire collection. There’s advice for where to find clothes that actually fit well, self-care information, powerful motivators, and so much more. There is a wonderfully great amount of inclusivity here in terms of race, gender, sexuality, size, and ability, which is incredible to see.

I’m so glad that many of the essays brought up the fact that doctors and health professionals aren’t always welcoming to fat people. While I’ve been fortunate enough to find a doctor that doesn’t treat my weight as something bad, I have friends who have gone through absolute hell to receive treatment for serious medical conditions. In one case, the doctors automatically assumed that the pain she was experiencing was a result of her weight, and she had to fight to get them to take her seriously. It’s atrocious to me that people have to deal with that kind of treatment from a medical community that is supposed to be there to help, and I’m glad that it’s something that received attention in some of these essays.

If you’re anything like me, it’s inspiring to know that there’s a community of people who look like you who are living their best life and loving their bodies. They know they don’t have to conform to what society and the media believe to be beautiful because they already know that they’re beautiful and wonderful. This collection is one that I can see myself coming back to over and over again when I have any negative thoughts about body image or just when I want to be inspired. I would recommend The (Other) F Word to everyone.


Pair with a candle for maximum relaxation!

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Champagne Toast White Barn 3-Wick Scented Candle


Have you read The (Other) F Word? If so, what did you think?

Who are your favorite body-positive influencers? Let us know in the comments!




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Is Your Anxiety Harming Your Relationships?

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I read this amazing article on the blog Wit & Delight today, written by Jackie Saffert. It made me reflect on my past relationships and how I reacted to the failure of those relationships.

Jackie Saffert writes about her own relationships and personal issues with anxiety,

It wasn’t until a week later that I understood the actual truth of it all: it’s not that I was too much. It’s that we weren’t right. I realized that when it’s right, me occasionally displaying anxiety won’t make the man I’m with shut down, roll over on his side, face the wall instead of me. When it’s right, if I’m feeling anxious, he’ll ask, “Are you okay?” He’ll hold me. We’ll work through it together, instead of shutting down apart.

and,

I adjusted myself to fit their lives—their schedules, their emotions, their timelines for what they could offer and when. I watered down anything about me I deemed might be too much for them. And if it all went wrong? I instinctively determined it was because of something I had done.

These aspects of her relationships can apply to many of my own early relationships, particularly in terms of “watering myself down” for my significant others. I was constantly terrified that my anxiety and depression were causing literally all of the problems in my romantic relationships. There was one relationship in particular where I felt that it was my anxiety and depression issues that caused it to fail. I blamed myself and beat myself up about it. It took me a long time after that relationship to understand that it wasn’t just me that caused it to end. 

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Jackie’s article brings up a really great point, however, that if the relationship was truly meant to be, anxiety or any other type of mental illness wouldn’t be enough to cause relationship issues. 

My current relationship is a case in point. My boyfriend has been incredibly supportive of my mental health struggles, and not once has it caused any problems between us, even when I was too depressed to go into work for several days. This is due to the fact that we’re right for one another, and something like anxiety isn’t going to end our relationship.

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My boyfriend has been nothing but supportive of my struggles, even going to doctors appointments with me, helping me keep track of how various medications are working, and holding me when I just need to relax in his arms.

What she says about adjusting herself to fit the lives of her romantic interests is something else that I want to talk about. I’ve done this so much, and looking back, I wish I hadn’t. You should never have to hide any part of who you are in order to keep a relationship happy. If you find yourself doing that, you might want to take a step back and consider if your relationship could be better.

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Embrace who you are and what you want to do. Never “water yourself down” to make a significant other happy. If you two were meant to be happy together, you won’t need to.



What do you think? Let me know in the comments!




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